“Vedas” The mystery decoded

“India is the birth place of two important religions (Hinduism and Buddhism). Today, nearly half the world’s population live in countries whose cultural development has been influenced by one or both of these religions. Apart from India itself, these countries include China, Tibet, Nepal, Japan, Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos, and Indonesia. The influence of ancient India was not just limited to its religions. Indian mathematicians were the first in the Old World to discover the mathematical value of zero, and gave the world quadratic equations and the now universally used system of ‘Arabic’ numerals. The alphabets of Tibet, Mongolia and all of the Southeast Asian languages are of Indian origin. Yet despite their wide-ranging influence, the early civilizations of the Indian subcontinent are the least well known of any of the ancient civilizations."

           By John Haywood in his book ‘The Ancient world’*

“India has Vedic traditions and it is the mother land of our race, Sanskrit, European language. It is the mother of our Philosophy, mathematics, ideals embodied in Christianity, through the village community, self government and democracy.”

                    By Will Durant in his book ‘A case for India’*   

“The Vedas still represent eternal truth in the purest form ever written”

By Professor Paul William Roberts in ‘Empire of the Soul’*


“I wish to point out that there was another sphere of intellectual activity in which the Hindus excelled-the meditative and transcendent-and that here we might learn from them some lessons of life which we ourselves are but too apt to ignore or to despise.”

By Max Muller in ‘India: What Can it Teach Us’*

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* A Look at India from the Views of Other Scholars  (Excerpt from Mysteries of the Ancient Vedic Empire by Stephen Knapp)

 

 

“Dancing, Painting, sculpture and Music were the part of Harappa Culture. Also they amuse themselves with the pets, monkeys, squirrels....”

By Michel Danino in his book ‘ The Invasion that Never Was’*

In the beginning there was one culture-that of spirit-and one language-that of truth. This culture was outwardly one of worship and inwardly one of meditation. The language was one of the mantra and communication was from the heart.”

By David Frawley in ‘Sages and Kings: Vedic Secrets of Ancient Civilization’*

“The transmission of Indian culture to distant parts of Central Asia, China, Japan and especially Southeast Asia is certainly one of the greatest achievements of Indian History or even the history of mankind. None of the other great civilizations-not even Hellenic-had been able to achieve a similar success without military conquest.”

By Khulke and Rothermund in ‘History of India’*

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* A Look at India from the Views of Other Scholars  (Excerpt from Mysteries of the Ancient Vedic Empire by Stephen Knapp)

“I rejoice to learn that you recognize how indissolubly the prosperity of the United Kingdom is bound with the retention of that vast Eastern Empire”

By Lord Robert

"Five thousand years ago, civilization of India was age-old. This civilization should be much older with many millennia of human endeavor behind it. Five thousand years ago, when the peoples of Europe were hauling stones across the face of the continent and grubbing out a meager existence, Indians throughout what is now western and southern Pakistan and Punjab, and even farther to the East, were living in elaborately designed cities, with sturdy houses, broad, straight roads, public baths, and drainage systems that were hardly equaled until the Roman era three thousand years later.... But five thousand years ago, according to archeologist John Marshal, the Indus Valley civilization was already age-old and stereotyped on Indian soil, with many millennia of human endeavor behind it.Usually we think of Mesopotamia as the cradle of civilization, but evidence suggests that the society of

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* A Look at India from the Views of Other Scholars (Excerpt from Mysteries of the Ancient Vedic Empire by Stephen Knapp)

 

north-western India, which has preserved its essential spirit over countless generations, deserve equal billing."

By Professor James Traub in Indian-The Challenge of Change*

"Thanks to the labors of a science which is comparatively recent, and more especially to the researches of the students of Hindu and Egyptian antiquities, it is very much easier today than it was not so long ago to discover the source, to ascend the course and unravel the underground network of that great mysterious river which since the beginning of history has been flowing beneath all the religions, all the faiths, and all the philosophies: in a word, beneath all the visible and everyday manifestations of human thought. It is now hardly to be contested that this source is to be found in ancient India. Thence in all probability the sacred teaching spread into Egypt, found its way to ancient Persia and Chaldea, permeated the Hebrew race, and crept into Greece and

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* A Look at India from the Views of Other Scholars (Excerpt from Mysteries of the Ancient Vedic Empire by Stephen Knapp)

 

the north of Europe, finally reaching China and even America." 

By Maurice Maeterlinckin ‘Great Secret’*

"There are four main cradles of civilization, from which elements of culture have spread to other parts of the world. These are, moving from east to west, China, the Indian subcontinent, the ‘Fertile Crescent’, and the Mediterranean, especially Greece and Italy. Of these four areas, India deserves a larger share of the credit than she is usually given, because, on a minimum assessment, she has deeply affected the religious life of most of Asia, as well as extending her influence, directly or indirectly, to other parts of the world."

By A.L Basham in Cultural History of India*

"In the history of human culture, the contribution of the Indian people in all fields has been of the greatest importance. From India we are said to have derived domestic poultry, shellac, lemons, cotton, jute, rice, sugar, indigo, the buffalo, cinnamon, ginger, pepper, sugar-cane, the games of chess, pachisi, and polo, the zero concept, the decimal system, the basis of certain

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* A Look at India from the Views of Other Scholars (Excerpt from Mysteries of the Ancient Vedic Empire by Stephen Knapp)

 

philological concepts, a wealth of fables with moral import, an astonishing variety of artistic products, and innumerable ideas of philosophy and religion such as asceticism and monasticism."

By William H Gilbert ‘Peoples of India’*

"This is India! Cradle of the human race, birthplace of human speech, mother of history, grandmother of legend, great-grandmother of tradition, whose yesterdays bear date with the moldering antiquities of the rest of the nations,... one land that all men desire to see, and having seen once, by even a glimpse, would not give that glimpse for the shows of all the rest of the globe combined. India had the start of the whole world in the beginning of things. She had the first civilization; she had the first accumulation of material wealth; she was populous with deep thinkers and subtle intellects. India is the prime source of human development." 

By Mark Twain in ‘Following the Equator’*

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* A Look at India from the Views of Other Scholars (Excerpt from Mysteries of the Ancient Vedic Empire by Stephen Knapp)

 

 

“India is the pivot of our Empire. If this empire lost any other part of its dominion we could survive, but if we lost India the sun of our Empire would be set. “

                                                By Lord Curzon (Viceroy)*

Not only was the Vedic Indian influence recognized to the west of India, but also far to east.”

By Rene Grousset in Farther India and the Malay Archipelago*

.....................................................................................* A Look at India from the Views of Other Scholars (Excerpt from Mysteries of the Ancient Vedic Empire by Stephen Knapp)

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